Meetings: On point, encourage ideas, set tasks, end on time

If you ask most any professional in a business setting, you will find that one of the most painful aspects of his or her position is going to meetings.

If you ask most any professional in a business setting, you will find that one of the most painful aspects of his or her position is going to meetings.

Unfortunately, attending meetings is a way of life for most professionals. It is truly vital to our jobs.

Imagine if doctors said they didn’t care to see patients or musicians said they disliked performances. We have to get over our dislike of meetings to be more productive and happy in our work.

Because meetings often are painful, we often put them off, not having them until the need becomes so great that we must meet. That meeting then becomes the embodiment of everything we hate about meetings: too long, too much being discussed, boring and the list goes on.

What should we do? We should learn to have more productive meetings.

Not only meetings that are more productive, but more of them. That is right. More of them.

According to Patrick Lencioni of California-based The Table Group, a consulting firm specializing in executive team development, there should be four types of meetings:

DAILY CHECK-INS: These meetings should be held daily, lasting at most about five minutes.

During this time, people share daily schedules and activities. These should be stand-up meetings dealing primarily with administrative issues.

Hold these daily regardless of who is absent. These meetings often save the need for catching someone via phone or email regarding simple administrative issues.

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