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Editor at Large

Meeting sadness: Or how to fill your day getting nothing done

If you really want to make it hurt: A dull, cold and clinical setting adds to the boredom and pain of meetings.
If you really want to make it hurt: A dull, cold and clinical setting adds to the boredom and pain of meetings. - (Photo / )

Having last ripped into the concept of incessant meetings about a year ago, it’s time to do it again.

This time, Jill Shaul, a marketing and communications pro from the Boston area, gets the credit for a LinkedIn post on meeting madness. It was posted two years ago but yours truly just came across it.

Shaul wonders how her calendar gets booked with so many meetings. She partially blames herself and, to that end, offers ways to get out of meetings and to shorten meetings.

If invited to a meeting:

-- If there is no agenda on the invite, decline.

-- Reject all meetings held before 8 a.m. and after 5 p.m.

-- Ask yourself if you really need to be there? Is there someone else on the invite list who can cover your part?

If you are organizing a meeting:

-- Start meetings at 15 minutes past the hour and end them at the top of the hour, after 45 minutes tops.

-- Rethink if weekly or biweekly meetings are really necessary.

-- It’s OK to end a meeting early if everything is covered.

-- And here’s a great one: Ask yourself if you really do need a meeting for the topic(s). Can it be covered in an email?

Well, have to go. We have a meeting about how to schedule meetings.

RANDOM SHOTS AND SECOND THOUGHTS

-- I’m working on an invention that will allow me at any point in the work day to fast-forward as many as four hours toward 5 p.m. My hunch is the masses will love it.

-- Best nickname for Congress – The Tuesday-to-Thursdays Boys: And we wonder why so little gets done in Washington.

-- The most valuable Philadelphia Eagle is offensive tackle Lane Johnson. Since 2016, the team is 8-2 in games that he played and 2-8 in games in which he did not.

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