PPL proposes $450M meter replacement

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PPL has proposed the replacement of its meters.
PPL has proposed the replacement of its meters.

PPL Electric Utilities of Allentown said it is asking the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to approve a $450 million plan to replace its electric meters.

“Our electric meters are approaching the end of their useful life and we want to be proactive in replacing them,” said Robert M. Geneczko, vice president-customer services. “Technology has changed significantly since these meters were installed, and we’re looking forward to the expanded capabilities that will create benefits for our customers.”

The plan calls for the replacement of 1.4 million electric meters between 2017 and 2019.

PPL spokesman Paul Wirth said the average residential customer will pay about $2.79 per month over the time the meters are in service, those costs would be phased in beginning in 2015 and will decrease after the installation period.

“That is the average of what customers will pay over the lifetime of the meters,” Wirth said. “It will start out at about 58 cents per month in 2015 and then peak during installation between 2017 and 2019 and then taper off again.”

The meters are expected to have a life expectancy of 15 years.

There were no numbers available on the average cost to business customers due to the wide variety of electricity needs.

Stacy Wescoe

Stacy Wescoe

Writer and online editor Stacy Wescoe has her finger on the pulse of the business community in the Greater Lehigh Valley and keeps you up-to-date with technology and trends, plus what coworkers and competitors are talking about around the water cooler — and on social media. She can be reached at stacyw@lvb.com or 610-807-9619, ext. 104. Follow her on Twitter at @morestacy and on Facebook. Circle Stacy Wescoe on .

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