These are the costliest commutes in the Valley and Berks

By - Last modified: June 20, 2013 at 9:50 AM

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Photo by Steve Williams: Traffic congestion is costing Valley commuters millions according to a report by a transportation advocacy group.
Photo by Steve Williams: Traffic congestion is costing Valley commuters millions according to a report by a transportation advocacy group.

If your commute takes you onto Route 22 between Interstate 78 and Route 33, traffic congestion could be costing you an extra 143 hours of drive time a year, wasting 61 additional gallons of gas and costing you a total of $51 per week or $2,639 more a year – when wear and tear on the vehicle and lost time for the motorists are included.

According to a new report released by TRIP, a Washington, D.C. -based transportation advocacy organization, that stretch of road is the costliest commute in the Lehigh Valley.

The report, which it released today, shows that Lehigh Valley and Berks-area traffic congestion costs a total of $410 million each year.

Other bad congestion points:

• U.S. 422 from Morwood Avenue to Woodside Avenue in Reading. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 45 hours annually, 19 additional gallons of gas and $829 annually, or $16 weekly.

• U.S. 222 from Dries Road to the Lehigh County line in Berks County. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 42 hours, 18 additional gallons of gas and $767 annually, or $15 weekly.

• Cedar Crest Boulevard from Route 22 to Chestnut Street in the Lehigh Valley. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 40 hours annually, 17 additional gallons of gas and $736 annually, or $14 weekly.

• State Route 12 from Interstate 376 Elizabeth Avenue to State Route 622 in Reading. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 21 hours annually, nine additional gallons of gas and $384 annually, or seven dollars weekly.

• U.S. 422 from Monocacy Creek Road to Pottstown Bypass in Reading. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 18 hours annually, seven additional gallons of gas and $322 annually, or six dollars weekly.

• State Hill Road from State Route 625 to State Route 422 in Reading. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 17 hours annually, seven additional gallons of gas and $307 annually, or six dollars weekly.

• State Hill Road from State Route 3422 to State Route 3055 in Reading. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 17 hours annually, seven additional gallons of gas and $307 annually, or six dollars weekly.

• Route 191 from Route 22 to Route 946 in the Lehigh Valley. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 17 hours annually, seven additional gallons of gas and $307 annually, or six dollars weekly.

• Mauch Chunk Road from Schadt Avenue to Route 22 in the Lehigh Valley. This congested corridor costs the average rush-hour driver 15 hours annually, six additional gallons of gas and $276 annually, or five dollars weekly.

To estimate the amount of time and fuel lost annually by commuters traveling on these segments, TRIP said it compared travel times during rush hour and noncongested periods.

In total, it said traffic congestion in the Lehigh Valley results in the use of an additional 8.5 million gallons of fuel and the loss of 19 million hours annually.

Stacy Wescoe

Stacy Wescoe

Writer and online editor Stacy Wescoe has her finger on the pulse of the business community in the Greater Lehigh Valley and keeps you up-to-date with technology and trends, plus what coworkers and competitors are talking about around the water cooler — and on social media. She can be reached at stacyw@lvb.com or 610-807-9619, ext. 104. Follow her on Twitter at @morestacy and on Facebook. Circle Stacy Wescoe on .

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